Guide English Sentence Analysis: An Introductory Course

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Can a social perspective shed new light on old philosophical problems, such as scepticism? In order to address these questions, we are mainly going to read and discuss texts by contemporary epistemologists. The seminar will be held in English. Das Seminar soll von Frau Dr. Tatjana Visak gehalten werden.

No events were found. Text as data: The promise and pitfalls of automatic content analysis methods for political texts. Political Analysis, 21 3 , Wouter van Atteveldt The explosion of digital communication and increasing efforts to digitize existing material has produced a deluge of material such as digitized historical news archives, policy and legal documents, political debates and millions of social media messages by politicians, journalists, and citizens. Traditional manual content analysis does not scale to very large data sets due to high cost and complexity.

For this reason, many researchers turn o automatic text analysis using techniques such as dictionary analysis, automatic clustering and scaling of latent traits, and machine learning. To properly use such techniques, however, requires a very specific skillset. This course aims to give students a basic introduction to text analysis and computational thinking. R will be used as platform and language of instruction, but the basic principles and methods are easily generalizable to other languages and tools such as python.

Micro-targeting, personalized news feeds, and other algorithmic recommendation system — the online environment is structured along numerous mechanisms that lead to a personalized user experience. From the perspective of strategic communication planning, the digital age seems to offer almost infinite options for tailored message distribution.

From a societal perspective, it can be asked whether these new possibilities turn us into easily manipulable citizens and consumers. Against this background, it appears necessary to delve into theories and empirical findings on differential media effects. The class will review classical as well as more recent research on factors that help explain why media effects occur differently among different individuals or under dferent situational circumstances.

Stochastic equations through the eye of the physicist basic concepts, exact results and asymptotic

These factors include but are not limited to personality, attitudes, individual preferences and habits, media perceptions, influences of the social environment, social identity, cultural norms, or short-term states such as emotional arousal. Students will form a number of working groups that concentrate on a self-selected aspect from that list or beyond and keep working on this aspect throughout the term. In a first step, all groups will review extant literature on how their respective factor moderates media effects in general.

In a second step, we will adapt these results on the new algorithmic media environments of web 2. Course Requirements: Term paper. This course offers its participants an opportunity to experience, reflect on and apply a goal-oriented approach to intercultural learning. In addition to exploring some of the recommendations offered by researchers on facilitating intercultural communication and deepening understandings of one's own and the other's culture, the course takes on a rather hands-on approach, allowing students to perform cultural mini-dramas, view video clips as the basis for analyzing key concepts discussed, write about critical incidents and discuss evolving understandings of the nature of interaction in intercultural encounters.

Intercultural, multicultural, transcultural or crosscultural? In the context of culture and communication we come across a huge variety of terms and concepts. In this course, we take a critical look at the different definitions of these terms. Along with analyzing the theoretical concepts, participants will also be involved in role play, group work, activities, and discussions on the topic. In addition, students will have the chance to reflect upon personal intercultural experiences.

By the end of the semester, participants will have a broad understanding of the variety of concepts of intercultural communication. Further, participants will be able to critically evaluate different approaches based on theoretical input and interdisciplinary perspectives. Due to the international setting of the class, participants will have their individual experiences in working and learning in an intercultural environment.

Hudson, J. The seminar will combine insights from the philosophiscal and historic roots of welfare ideas with contepmorary insights from cultural studies and political science. Despite a decrease in readership numbers and predictions of the death of print due, the number of magazine titles continues to grow. It seems that the magazine, particularly the independent magazine the object of our discussion , is in a seemingly endless state of evolution. In his The Magazine Blueprint: The Ultimate Guide to Indie Publishing, Conor Purcell sets the following parameters for an indie: they play with form everything from paper size and quality to the type of binding ; they have diverse content; they use diverse production techniques; they use technological advances to promote the magazine to world-wide audiences; their revenue comes purely from the number of hard-copies sold ergo, they may not generate any revenue at all.

They are dedicated to the print medium because of its aesthetic and haptic capabilities and come in seemingly any size, on any type of paper, in any color. Their nichey-ness on the one hand, combined with the particular indie aesthetic, creates a reading experience decidedly different than that of reading a mainstream glossy. In this course, we will consider the indie magazine and zines for their content, form, and the magazine-specific communities they form imagined, embodied, brand, virtual. We will also discuss how the internet has contributed to the rise and creation of the indies.

Literature: Abrahamson D. Prior-Miller Hg. Haveman, H. Le Masurier, Megan. Sumner, David E. A Complete Guide to the Industry. Media Industries Vol. David Sumner. T he Magazine Documents of contemporary art series. Whitechapel Gallery Alison Piepmeier. Jane Bennett. Duke UP, Bruno Latour. Reset Modernity. The MIT P, Timothy Morton. Hyperobjects: Philosophy and Ecology after the End of the World. U of Minnesota P, Elizabeth A. Geontologies: A Requiem of Late Liberalism.

Anna Tsing. Princeton UP, Karen Barad. William Connolly. Donna Haraway. Rob Nixon. Alexa Weik von Mossner. Seminar Paper: Each student will produce a seminar paper on selected works. Facing the environmental crisis we are living in today, scholars in the Humanities have shown an increasing interest in the shared material basis of human and more-than-human entities and their entanglements. Therefore, questions of kinship and the co-creation and co-existence in the making of the world are raised by scholars such as Donna Haraway, allowing for a better understanding of the Anthropocene and the consequences of human influence on the environment.

But what does it mean to co-exist? How do we reshape our understandings of material agency? This class sets out to answer these questions by providing an overview of current New Materialisms and their implications in environmental humanities. We will discuss terms such as human, non-human, and matter and look at the ongoing discussion of the Anthropocene from different perspectives.

Povinelli, and Timothy Morton and others. The main goal is to engage with this ongoing discussion of the Anthropocene as well as ideas of human exploitation of the environment and our understanding of human and non-human entanglements. Know the basics of synchronic linguistics Practise linguistic analyses in the areas of sounds, words, and sentences Find out what is interesting to you in linguistics Learn to work with English textbooks Learn to accumulate and aggregate information from different sources. Radford, A. Linguistics: An introduction 2nd ed. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

A list of further readings will be provided in class. This course is designed to introduce students to the central terms and topics in current English linguistics. Topics to be dealt with include phonetics, phonology, morphology, semantics, syntax, and major syntactic contrasts between English and German.

We will also have a brief look at how these topics relate to language acquisition, language storage and processing in the human brain, and language variation over time and society.


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In this course you have a chance to revise and deepen your knowledge in linguistics core areas, sounds, words, and sentences. Analyse data. Reichling; Schloss Ehrenhof West. Hemingway be interpreted as a novel cf. Wainwright, August , May 9. Famous painters include Michelangelo. In this class, we will deal with chunks of language larger than an individual sentence and try to answer the following questions: What is a text?

What is it that turns a sequence of sentences into a text? What role do sounds, words, and sentences play in a text? Do communicative principles apply to texts and how? Revise and deepen your knowledge of linguistic core concepts concerning the lexicon, syntax and semantics Develop an understanding of idiomaticity as an all-pervasive element of human language Learn to apply appropriate terminology and theories to describe and explore the phenomenon of idiomaticity in exercises and individual research projects Practice your skills in critical thinking and academic reading and writing.

Textbook: Fiedler, Sabine English Phraseology: A Coursebook. In this course we will examine recurrent word combinations like idioms e. You are welcome, I see, Never mind. Such lexicalized multi-word items constitute a considerable part of any natural language and pose a particular challenge for the linguist as well as for the language learner. Among topics to be discussed are questions of classification, pragmatic and stylistic aspects, and also psycholinguistic aspects of formulaic language. You will revise and deepen your knowledge of linguistic core concepts in the areas of sounds, words and sentences.

You will develop a basic understanding of how human language is organized, how knowledge of language is acquired, and how knowledge of language is put to use, in the production and comprehension of words, sentences, and pieces of discourse by monolinguals and bilinguals as well as healthy and impaired language users. You will become familiar with a variety of empirical observational and experimental tools used by psycholinguists to study language acquisition and language performance. You will compare modern approaches in psycholinguistics in terms of their power to account for the psychological processes.

You will practice your skills in critical thinking, academic reading, writing, presenting and teamwork. Harley, T. Talking the talk. New York: Psychology Press. Term paper or oral exam. The term paper Hausarbeit takes the form of an online take-home exam words. How do we learn and use language, and how come we communicate so efficiently? This course provides you with an overview of the major topics and areas of psycholinguistics. We will look at differences between animal communication and human language, how children acquire language, what happens when we learn a second language and why this is often so hard , how words shape our thinking and how we understand and produce sentences.

Aitchison, J. Words in the mind: An introduction to the mental lexicon. Altmann, G. The ascent of Babel: An exploration of language, mind, and understanding. OUP Oxford. Written exam - 90min. During this course, we will focus on the mental lexicon, which metaphorically can be understood as a dictionary or a database of all words stored in the mind of a language user Dijkstra, We will explore the way in which we activate and access information in the lexicon by considering different word recognition models.

Also, we will address the nature of information stored in the lexicon as well as the organization of lexico-semantic structures in monolingual and bilingual speakers. Furthermore, we will discuss the way in which children acquire words, the representation of lexical information in atypical populations such as dyslexics or aphasic patients, and we will explore what happens with the mental lexicon as we age. Apply basic knowledge of linguistic levels of description to diachronic linguistics Develop a basic understanding of the dynamics of language change Learn to apply appropriate terminology and theories to describe the phenomenon of language change Learn to understand how diachronic texts are constructed linguistically Enhance your skills in critical reflection and academic reading, presenting, writing and analyzing Enhance your skills in orally expressing your own opinion in English.

Understanding language change. English is spoken by around million people worldwide, and as a second language by over a billion more. So one could think that English is pretty easy and simple. In fact, English is super weird and complex and this is due to its stormy history. We know that the British Isles have been very attractive for many different peoples and with each new wave of invasion came a new language and mingled with whatever people were speaking before. So if we want to understand the nature of Present-Day English and how it developed into the powerhouse language it is today, we need to take a look back in time and see what it was like when it was more Germanic Old English and how it became more and more different from other Germanic languages, for example under the influence of French and Latin Middle English.

Changes can be quickly identified if we compare a Present-Day English sentence with an Old English sentence like 1 The cruel man cut a page from the book. We see right away that most of the Old English grammatical system has withered away. Further, many many words and structures of Romance origin came to English instigated by the Norman Conquest in This course provides an introduction to diachronic linguistics, which will also include an overview of the history of the English language.

Accordingly, we will discuss changes on all levels of language, but a focus will be on grammatical change and contact-induced change. All phenomena will be illustrated by examples taken from the English language history which spans almost sixteen centuries: Old English , Middle English , Early Modern English and Modern English from onwards. What books do you take on a train ride? Which literature do you find fascinating?

And what is literature anyway? What do we love about it? Its form, its language, its stories, its topics? And how can we analyse literature, critically think about it and thereby enrich and enhance our understanding of it, going even beyond our initial love of books? This course, which is designed to introduce beginners to central approaches to the study of British and American literature, will tackle issues like these. It will start by answering the question what literature and the study of literature actually are and then provide an introduction to the three main genres of literature written in English prose, drama and poetry.

In discussing these genres, we will have a closer look at key theoretical concepts and tools for the analysis of literary texts. Besides, we will also identify important periods in the history of British and American literature. The course will be taught in English and will partly take the form of an inverted class room see requirements , which will allow you to make the best of the time spent in class practicing literary analysis.

All other texts will be provided on Ilias. Hajo Treutler; Schloss Ehrenhof West. Engaging with the radically altered experience of human life under the conditions of modernity, modernist writing is famous for its innovations in literary form as much as content. In this seminar, reading a variety of short stories will introduce students to key features of modernist writing.

As we are looking at a number of different authors and texts, we will get an overview of social, political and cultural concerns that modernist writing reflected upon.

An Introductory Course in Theoretical English Grammar

At the same time, we will discuss what literary techniques writers developed to grapple with the condition of modernity. Wilde, Oscar. The Importance of Being Earnest. Norton, T he Picture of Dorian Gray. Complete Short Fiction. Penguin Classics, Wilde has defined our understanding of the Victorian period like no other, capturing the absurdities and Janus-faced nature of a time long gone. His texts are not only a very funny, entertaining read, they also hold up a mirror to his contemporaries, criticising imperialism, the British class system, and gender roles alike.

Additionally, we will have a look at some of his lesser known works, such as short stories, poetry, and prison letters, as well as his writing on literature and art. Having attended the seminar, students are able to Please purchase the following three novels please select the editions below : Levy, Andrea.

Small Island. Tinder Press, Smith, Zadie. Swing Time. Hamish Hamilton Penguin Books , Gunaratne, Guy. In Our Mad and Furious City. By choosing this title, the author Paul Gilroy does not aim to align with those who coined it as a racist slogan. Challenging this conspicuous absence, this seminar aims to trace a history of black Britain as integrated into the history of Britain, all the while considering the wider connections of the African diaspora. In each novel, questions of identity feature prominently. Besides our reading of selected theoretical texts, room will also be given to explore dub and grime music: its sound, politics, and the particular form of the song lyric.

Participants will be able to describe the significant stages in the development of the detective story over the course of a century and a half, with reference to 1. Paticipants will demonstrate the skills of literary analysis as applied to texts novels and short stories from the s to the s. Participants will develop their skill in expressing themselves, orally and in writing, in academically correct English. One term paper or an oral exam to be determined at the first meeting of the seminar.

Detective fiction is a genre of popular literature that originated in a series of short stories published by Edgar Allan Poe in the s. It is today a worldwide phenomenon, and a lens through which writers with various agendas can critique issues of social justice. This seminar will look at the genre's origins in Poe's M. We will consider the formal evolution of the genre's narrative structure, but will concentrate upon those social issues: the source of authority gray cells? A further and important aim of the seminar is to practice the interpretation of literary and other cultural texts.

What questions can be posed, what is an interesting reading that does not just repeat what the text already says, and how can you present the results of your reading to a public? The seminar, which might also be helpful for preparing final oral exams, will make students familiar with a wide range of literary US-American texts since , will introduce them to and practice procedures of interpretation, and allow them to present their theses in class.

By the beginning of the semester, students are supposed to have acquired and read Sylvia Plath, The Bell Jar. Presentation in class, seminar paper 15 pages in English or oral exam before the Christmas break. In this seminar we will read and discuss mostly literary and some other US-American cultural texts since We will discuss novels, poems, and films that can be seen as representative of their historical period. This class investigates several theoretical approaches to literature of the 20th and 21st century. By reading theoretical key texts, we will identify and investigate the questions that have animated critical discussions among literary critics in the past century.

The topics will include but are not limited to structuralism, poststructuralism, critical race theory, critical feminist theory, gender theory, Marxist theory, etc. To consolidate the new knowledge, we will apply the theories to a selected literary text. Over the course of the semester, students All other primary and secondary sources will be provided on Ilias. The city of Detroit has become known as many things: as the center of the US-American automobile industry Motor City , as the home of Motown, Eminem, and Techno, and as the city that has experienced a socio-economic ascent and decline unprecedented among US-American cities.

Through the lenses of literature, music, art, and film, this seminar investigates the enormous economic, social, and cultural changes Detroit has undergone in the last century, and how it has nevertheless or precisely for this reason left a significant mark on US-American culture as a whole. In this course you have a chance to … learn about language acquisition, discourse analysis, and literacy.

Term paper or oral exam Note that participation in the first session is obligatory, missing the session without giving notive might result in losing your chance to participate. Why would a linguist be interested in child literature? Well, because there is great child literature that plays with language and is fun to read. In this course we take child literature as a starting and focal point to think about and discuss discourse structur how child literature differs from spoken discourse and supports language acquisition and development.

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In other words, this course brings together the fields of discourse analysis, language acquisition, and literacy. Participants are expected to pursue their own group project and in this project you might also analyse other types of literature from a linguistic point of view. At the end of the semester you should be … able to classify English verbs morphologically, syntactically and semantically aware of different verb classes and types and can explain what the consequences for their syntactic development are The verb is the heart of a sentence as it determines, how many arguments will be needed for a well-formed sentence.

In this course we will take a closer look at the morphological differences of different verb classes, investigate syntactic differences between different verb types and look at interrelations between verb semantics and syntactic structures. In other words: Among other questions we will investigate what may contributes to the meaning of 1 and 2 and why 3 is ungrammatical. We will discuss why 4 is grammatical without the complement and 5 is not and why the expletive there can be the subject of seem but not of see.

The course gives you an overview of theoretical accounts of morphological processing. In addition to work on prototypical native speakers, we will also discuss morphological processing in other groups, such as second-language learners or bilingual heritage speakers. You will also get an introduction to experimental psycholinguistic techniques such as eye-tracking or EEG. Finally, the course allows you to practice reading scientific articles published in peer-reviewed journals.

This can initially be quite tedious, but will definitely come in handy in the later stages of your studies, such as for Bachelor and Master theses. Please take into account that we will mainly work with scientific articles published in peer-reviewed academic journals. One of the fiercest debates in experimental psycholinguistic research revolves around the issue of how morphologically complex words are represented in our mind and brain.

It is this question which constitutes the starting point of our seminar. The processing of individual words in humans is typically an extremely fast, automatic, and at least in native speakers largely effortless process. As a result, the study of morphological processing requires the use of sophisticated experimental paradigms, which are able to tap into such an extremely fast process. The seminar thus also constitutes a good opportunity to get a basic introduction to experimental techniques which can be used to study human language processing and production in the lab, such as eye-tracking, EEG, fMRI, or fNIRS.

Textbook: van Gelderen, Elly A History of the English Language. Amsterdam: John Benjamins. Written exam 90 minutes or term paper pages. Based on the book A History of the English Language details see below we will review the basic terms and concepts used in the field of diachronic linguistics. You will enhance your skills in reading Old and Middle English texts in order to see the changes we talk about for yourself.

We will move from concrete examples to the more general trends and begin to explore the factors that promote or inhibit language change: Who or what makes a language change? Can language change be encouraged?


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Can it be prevented? Can its direction be predicted? Which components of a language are more stable and which are changed easily? And why? Many different answers to these questions have been brought forward in the course of time, and still there plenty we do not fully understand. This course is not for those who need clear answers that can be learned by heart. A selection of the most important concepts, topics, and currents of Postcolonial Theory will be considered in relation to parallel literary movements such as Postmodernism and Poststructuralism which have influenced Postcolonial Studies.

Requirements Texts and discussions in German or English Grades will be based on the following: a minute oral presentation about a topic, e. More information. Registration : All incoming exchange students at the School of Humanities need to register for their courses via the Registration Form which will be emailed to them before the start of the semester. For further information please contact incoming phil. This lecture will provide an overview of some of the major concepts of cultural studies. Each session will focus on a different concept and will provide historical and theoretical context, while applying this concept to relevant examples.

Theoretical approaches will include gender, race, postcolonialism, knowledge, nature, and more. You do not need to register for the tutorial. If you are visiting the lecture IDV International Cultural Studies, you will be assigned to one of the two tutorials. Please do not include it in your registration form. Shelly Kagan Normative Ethics, Westview Press. Whether a given action is required, permitted, or forbidden is typically a function of several different morally relevant factors.

Much of the work of normative ethics is a matter of articulating these various normative factors, and discovering how they interact so as to determine the moral status of an act. An example should help to make this idea of normative factors clearer. Suppose that someone is drowning in the lake, and the only way she can be saved is if I row out to her in a boat and pull her in. Should I do it?

Presumably, the fact that my act would have a good result — it would save a life! Suppose that the only boat at hand is not mine, but rather belongs to someone else. If I am to rescue the drowning woman, I must steal it […]. Whether I should still take the boat out or not depends on which of these two factors is more important, morally speaking […] and the moral status of the act depends on which factor outweighs the other. There are other factors that might come into play as well. We will read each chapter of the book and discuss the main questions about the precise content, significance and scope of factors such as consequences, harm, consent, or rights.

The second half of the book examines competing theories about the foundations of normative ethics, theories that attempt to explain why the basic factors have the moral significance that they do. We will try to understand the division between moral factors and theoretical foundations that Kagan offers. The reading list will be provided at the beginning of the semester. How do social problems harm the acquisition and distribution of knowledge? How should we react if we realize that an epistemic peer disagrees with us?

Can a social perspective shed new light on old philosophical problems, such as scepticism? In order to address these questions, we are mainly going to read and discuss texts by contemporary epistemologists. The seminar will be held in English. Das Seminar soll von Frau Dr. Tatjana Visak gehalten werden. No events were found. Text as data: The promise and pitfalls of automatic content analysis methods for political texts.

Political Analysis, 21 3 , Wouter van Atteveldt The explosion of digital communication and increasing efforts to digitize existing material has produced a deluge of material such as digitized historical news archives, policy and legal documents, political debates and millions of social media messages by politicians, journalists, and citizens.

Traditional manual content analysis does not scale to very large data sets due to high cost and complexity. For this reason, many researchers turn o automatic text analysis using techniques such as dictionary analysis, automatic clustering and scaling of latent traits, and machine learning. To properly use such techniques, however, requires a very specific skillset. This course aims to give students a basic introduction to text analysis and computational thinking. R will be used as platform and language of instruction, but the basic principles and methods are easily generalizable to other languages and tools such as python.

Micro-targeting, personalized news feeds, and other algorithmic recommendation system — the online environment is structured along numerous mechanisms that lead to a personalized user experience. From the perspective of strategic communication planning, the digital age seems to offer almost infinite options for tailored message distribution. From a societal perspective, it can be asked whether these new possibilities turn us into easily manipulable citizens and consumers.

Against this background, it appears necessary to delve into theories and empirical findings on differential media effects. The class will review classical as well as more recent research on factors that help explain why media effects occur differently among different individuals or under dferent situational circumstances. These factors include but are not limited to personality, attitudes, individual preferences and habits, media perceptions, influences of the social environment, social identity, cultural norms, or short-term states such as emotional arousal.

Students will form a number of working groups that concentrate on a self-selected aspect from that list or beyond and keep working on this aspect throughout the term. In a first step, all groups will review extant literature on how their respective factor moderates media effects in general. In a second step, we will adapt these results on the new algorithmic media environments of web 2.

Course Requirements: Term paper. This course offers its participants an opportunity to experience, reflect on and apply a goal-oriented approach to intercultural learning. In addition to exploring some of the recommendations offered by researchers on facilitating intercultural communication and deepening understandings of one's own and the other's culture, the course takes on a rather hands-on approach, allowing students to perform cultural mini-dramas, view video clips as the basis for analyzing key concepts discussed, write about critical incidents and discuss evolving understandings of the nature of interaction in intercultural encounters.

Intercultural, multicultural, transcultural or crosscultural? In the context of culture and communication we come across a huge variety of terms and concepts. In this course, we take a critical look at the different definitions of these terms. Along with analyzing the theoretical concepts, participants will also be involved in role play, group work, activities, and discussions on the topic. In addition, students will have the chance to reflect upon personal intercultural experiences. By the end of the semester, participants will have a broad understanding of the variety of concepts of intercultural communication.

Further, participants will be able to critically evaluate different approaches based on theoretical input and interdisciplinary perspectives. Due to the international setting of the class, participants will have their individual experiences in working and learning in an intercultural environment. Hudson, J. The seminar will combine insights from the philosophiscal and historic roots of welfare ideas with contepmorary insights from cultural studies and political science.

Despite a decrease in readership numbers and predictions of the death of print due, the number of magazine titles continues to grow. It seems that the magazine, particularly the independent magazine the object of our discussion , is in a seemingly endless state of evolution.

In his The Magazine Blueprint: The Ultimate Guide to Indie Publishing, Conor Purcell sets the following parameters for an indie: they play with form everything from paper size and quality to the type of binding ; they have diverse content; they use diverse production techniques; they use technological advances to promote the magazine to world-wide audiences; their revenue comes purely from the number of hard-copies sold ergo, they may not generate any revenue at all. They are dedicated to the print medium because of its aesthetic and haptic capabilities and come in seemingly any size, on any type of paper, in any color.

Their nichey-ness on the one hand, combined with the particular indie aesthetic, creates a reading experience decidedly different than that of reading a mainstream glossy. In this course, we will consider the indie magazine and zines for their content, form, and the magazine-specific communities they form imagined, embodied, brand, virtual. We will also discuss how the internet has contributed to the rise and creation of the indies.

Literature: Abrahamson D. Prior-Miller Hg. Haveman, H. Le Masurier, Megan. Sumner, David E. A Complete Guide to the Industry. Media Industries Vol. David Sumner. T he Magazine Documents of contemporary art series. Whitechapel Gallery Alison Piepmeier. Jane Bennett. Duke UP, Bruno Latour. Reset Modernity. The MIT P, Timothy Morton. Hyperobjects: Philosophy and Ecology after the End of the World. U of Minnesota P, Elizabeth A.

Geontologies: A Requiem of Late Liberalism. Anna Tsing. Princeton UP, Karen Barad. William Connolly. Donna Haraway. Rob Nixon. Alexa Weik von Mossner. Seminar Paper: Each student will produce a seminar paper on selected works. Facing the environmental crisis we are living in today, scholars in the Humanities have shown an increasing interest in the shared material basis of human and more-than-human entities and their entanglements. Therefore, questions of kinship and the co-creation and co-existence in the making of the world are raised by scholars such as Donna Haraway, allowing for a better understanding of the Anthropocene and the consequences of human influence on the environment.

But what does it mean to co-exist? How do we reshape our understandings of material agency? This class sets out to answer these questions by providing an overview of current New Materialisms and their implications in environmental humanities. We will discuss terms such as human, non-human, and matter and look at the ongoing discussion of the Anthropocene from different perspectives. Povinelli, and Timothy Morton and others. The main goal is to engage with this ongoing discussion of the Anthropocene as well as ideas of human exploitation of the environment and our understanding of human and non-human entanglements.

Know the basics of synchronic linguistics Practise linguistic analyses in the areas of sounds, words, and sentences Find out what is interesting to you in linguistics Learn to work with English textbooks Learn to accumulate and aggregate information from different sources. Radford, A. Linguistics: An introduction 2nd ed.

Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. A list of further readings will be provided in class. This course is designed to introduce students to the central terms and topics in current English linguistics. Topics to be dealt with include phonetics, phonology, morphology, semantics, syntax, and major syntactic contrasts between English and German. We will also have a brief look at how these topics relate to language acquisition, language storage and processing in the human brain, and language variation over time and society. In this course you have a chance to revise and deepen your knowledge in linguistics core areas, sounds, words, and sentences.

Analyse data. Reichling; Schloss Ehrenhof West. Hemingway be interpreted as a novel cf. Wainwright, August , May 9. Famous painters include Michelangelo. In this class, we will deal with chunks of language larger than an individual sentence and try to answer the following questions: What is a text? What is it that turns a sequence of sentences into a text? What role do sounds, words, and sentences play in a text? Do communicative principles apply to texts and how? Revise and deepen your knowledge of linguistic core concepts concerning the lexicon, syntax and semantics Develop an understanding of idiomaticity as an all-pervasive element of human language Learn to apply appropriate terminology and theories to describe and explore the phenomenon of idiomaticity in exercises and individual research projects Practice your skills in critical thinking and academic reading and writing.

Textbook: Fiedler, Sabine English Phraseology: A Coursebook. In this course we will examine recurrent word combinations like idioms e. You are welcome, I see, Never mind. Such lexicalized multi-word items constitute a considerable part of any natural language and pose a particular challenge for the linguist as well as for the language learner. Among topics to be discussed are questions of classification, pragmatic and stylistic aspects, and also psycholinguistic aspects of formulaic language.

You will revise and deepen your knowledge of linguistic core concepts in the areas of sounds, words and sentences. You will develop a basic understanding of how human language is organized, how knowledge of language is acquired, and how knowledge of language is put to use, in the production and comprehension of words, sentences, and pieces of discourse by monolinguals and bilinguals as well as healthy and impaired language users.

You will become familiar with a variety of empirical observational and experimental tools used by psycholinguists to study language acquisition and language performance. You will compare modern approaches in psycholinguistics in terms of their power to account for the psychological processes. You will practice your skills in critical thinking, academic reading, writing, presenting and teamwork.

Harley, T. Talking the talk. New York: Psychology Press. Term paper or oral exam. The term paper Hausarbeit takes the form of an online take-home exam words. How do we learn and use language, and how come we communicate so efficiently? This course provides you with an overview of the major topics and areas of psycholinguistics.

We will look at differences between animal communication and human language, how children acquire language, what happens when we learn a second language and why this is often so hard , how words shape our thinking and how we understand and produce sentences. Aitchison, J. Words in the mind: An introduction to the mental lexicon.

Altmann, G. The ascent of Babel: An exploration of language, mind, and understanding. OUP Oxford. Written exam - 90min. During this course, we will focus on the mental lexicon, which metaphorically can be understood as a dictionary or a database of all words stored in the mind of a language user Dijkstra, We will explore the way in which we activate and access information in the lexicon by considering different word recognition models. Also, we will address the nature of information stored in the lexicon as well as the organization of lexico-semantic structures in monolingual and bilingual speakers.

Furthermore, we will discuss the way in which children acquire words, the representation of lexical information in atypical populations such as dyslexics or aphasic patients, and we will explore what happens with the mental lexicon as we age. Apply basic knowledge of linguistic levels of description to diachronic linguistics Develop a basic understanding of the dynamics of language change Learn to apply appropriate terminology and theories to describe the phenomenon of language change Learn to understand how diachronic texts are constructed linguistically Enhance your skills in critical reflection and academic reading, presenting, writing and analyzing Enhance your skills in orally expressing your own opinion in English.

Understanding language change. English is spoken by around million people worldwide, and as a second language by over a billion more. So one could think that English is pretty easy and simple. In fact, English is super weird and complex and this is due to its stormy history. We know that the British Isles have been very attractive for many different peoples and with each new wave of invasion came a new language and mingled with whatever people were speaking before.

So if we want to understand the nature of Present-Day English and how it developed into the powerhouse language it is today, we need to take a look back in time and see what it was like when it was more Germanic Old English and how it became more and more different from other Germanic languages, for example under the influence of French and Latin Middle English. Changes can be quickly identified if we compare a Present-Day English sentence with an Old English sentence like 1 The cruel man cut a page from the book. We see right away that most of the Old English grammatical system has withered away.

Further, many many words and structures of Romance origin came to English instigated by the Norman Conquest in This course provides an introduction to diachronic linguistics, which will also include an overview of the history of the English language. Accordingly, we will discuss changes on all levels of language, but a focus will be on grammatical change and contact-induced change.

All phenomena will be illustrated by examples taken from the English language history which spans almost sixteen centuries: Old English , Middle English , Early Modern English and Modern English from onwards. What books do you take on a train ride?

English Sentence Structure - English Grammar Lesson

Which literature do you find fascinating? And what is literature anyway? What do we love about it? Its form, its language, its stories, its topics? And how can we analyse literature, critically think about it and thereby enrich and enhance our understanding of it, going even beyond our initial love of books?

This course, which is designed to introduce beginners to central approaches to the study of British and American literature, will tackle issues like these. It will start by answering the question what literature and the study of literature actually are and then provide an introduction to the three main genres of literature written in English prose, drama and poetry. In discussing these genres, we will have a closer look at key theoretical concepts and tools for the analysis of literary texts.

Besides, we will also identify important periods in the history of British and American literature. The course will be taught in English and will partly take the form of an inverted class room see requirements , which will allow you to make the best of the time spent in class practicing literary analysis. All other texts will be provided on Ilias. Hajo Treutler; Schloss Ehrenhof West. Engaging with the radically altered experience of human life under the conditions of modernity, modernist writing is famous for its innovations in literary form as much as content.

In this seminar, reading a variety of short stories will introduce students to key features of modernist writing. As we are looking at a number of different authors and texts, we will get an overview of social, political and cultural concerns that modernist writing reflected upon. At the same time, we will discuss what literary techniques writers developed to grapple with the condition of modernity. Wilde, Oscar. The Importance of Being Earnest. Norton, T he Picture of Dorian Gray. Complete Short Fiction. Penguin Classics, Wilde has defined our understanding of the Victorian period like no other, capturing the absurdities and Janus-faced nature of a time long gone.

His texts are not only a very funny, entertaining read, they also hold up a mirror to his contemporaries, criticising imperialism, the British class system, and gender roles alike. Additionally, we will have a look at some of his lesser known works, such as short stories, poetry, and prison letters, as well as his writing on literature and art. Having attended the seminar, students are able to Please purchase the following three novels please select the editions below : Levy, Andrea.

Small Island. Tinder Press, Smith, Zadie. Swing Time. Hamish Hamilton Penguin Books , Gunaratne, Guy. In Our Mad and Furious City. By choosing this title, the author Paul Gilroy does not aim to align with those who coined it as a racist slogan. Challenging this conspicuous absence, this seminar aims to trace a history of black Britain as integrated into the history of Britain, all the while considering the wider connections of the African diaspora.

In each novel, questions of identity feature prominently. Besides our reading of selected theoretical texts, room will also be given to explore dub and grime music: its sound, politics, and the particular form of the song lyric. Participants will be able to describe the significant stages in the development of the detective story over the course of a century and a half, with reference to 1.

Paticipants will demonstrate the skills of literary analysis as applied to texts novels and short stories from the s to the s. Participants will develop their skill in expressing themselves, orally and in writing, in academically correct English. One term paper or an oral exam to be determined at the first meeting of the seminar.

Detective fiction is a genre of popular literature that originated in a series of short stories published by Edgar Allan Poe in the s. It is today a worldwide phenomenon, and a lens through which writers with various agendas can critique issues of social justice. This seminar will look at the genre's origins in Poe's M. We will consider the formal evolution of the genre's narrative structure, but will concentrate upon those social issues: the source of authority gray cells?

Transition Words & Phrases

A further and important aim of the seminar is to practice the interpretation of literary and other cultural texts. What questions can be posed, what is an interesting reading that does not just repeat what the text already says, and how can you present the results of your reading to a public? The seminar, which might also be helpful for preparing final oral exams, will make students familiar with a wide range of literary US-American texts since , will introduce them to and practice procedures of interpretation, and allow them to present their theses in class.

By the beginning of the semester, students are supposed to have acquired and read Sylvia Plath, The Bell Jar. Presentation in class, seminar paper 15 pages in English or oral exam before the Christmas break. In this seminar we will read and discuss mostly literary and some other US-American cultural texts since We will discuss novels, poems, and films that can be seen as representative of their historical period.

This class investigates several theoretical approaches to literature of the 20th and 21st century. By reading theoretical key texts, we will identify and investigate the questions that have animated critical discussions among literary critics in the past century.

The topics will include but are not limited to structuralism, poststructuralism, critical race theory, critical feminist theory, gender theory, Marxist theory, etc.

English Sentence Analysis : an Introductory Course

To consolidate the new knowledge, we will apply the theories to a selected literary text. Over the course of the semester, students All other primary and secondary sources will be provided on Ilias. The city of Detroit has become known as many things: as the center of the US-American automobile industry Motor City , as the home of Motown, Eminem, and Techno, and as the city that has experienced a socio-economic ascent and decline unprecedented among US-American cities.

Through the lenses of literature, music, art, and film, this seminar investigates the enormous economic, social, and cultural changes Detroit has undergone in the last century, and how it has nevertheless or precisely for this reason left a significant mark on US-American culture as a whole. In this course you have a chance to … learn about language acquisition, discourse analysis, and literacy. Term paper or oral exam Note that participation in the first session is obligatory, missing the session without giving notive might result in losing your chance to participate.

Why would a linguist be interested in child literature? Well, because there is great child literature that plays with language and is fun to read. In this course we take child literature as a starting and focal point to think about and discuss discourse structur how child literature differs from spoken discourse and supports language acquisition and development. In other words, this course brings together the fields of discourse analysis, language acquisition, and literacy. Participants are expected to pursue their own group project and in this project you might also analyse other types of literature from a linguistic point of view.

At the end of the semester you should be … able to classify English verbs morphologically, syntactically and semantically aware of different verb classes and types and can explain what the consequences for their syntactic development are